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Who's here at 5:15:55 AM on 12/12/2017?
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 ASUS VS BFG Geforce 280
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Stalkerrob
Senior Member
MY PC

Canada
555 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2008 :  03:35:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok heres the thing i am upgrading my video card. and there are two brands of the card i want so i googled the differences I came up with this http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2008/07/19/pre-oc-nvidia-geforce-gtx-280-260/1 I read allot of it and the main difference is the asus card is slightly overclocked and adds 12% more performance. According to the site i linked the BFG card is more expensive and has slightly less performance. But at Canada computers where i shop i found that the ASUS version is more expensive. but the price difference is because of the 12% more performance but the real Q: is If i get the ASUS one for the extra 12% performance Will the heat the thing will obviously throw off cook my card before i get any length of time out of the thing? What do you guys think i like more performance but if it kills it then whats the sense?

also don't forget to hit next page on the link :P



Edited by - Stalkerrob on 09/03/2008 03:36:46 AM

KC
Head Honcho
MY PC

USA
3052 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2008 :  09:49:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, if you had an AMD base I'd stick with ATI as AMD owns them now and have some CPU designed to work better with their vid cards, but since you are on an Intel platform that is not a factor.

Regardless of what the whole component board is, they are designed with a bunch of tolerance ranges, and to understand what that means you need to understand some basic electronics.

A board like a Video card or Motherboard has hundreds of little components on it.
Things like resisters, capacitors, transistors, etc.

As the elaborate circuit design is laid out, each of those components are given a value, like 150K Ohms or 10 Microfarad.
The thing is, all these little components can vary as much 20% from their stated value, but the next circuit expects the spec value.

Those hundreds of little components can be purchased by their Tolerance, or percentage of accuracy the component has to it’s stated value.

For example, a 100 ohm 1% (gold banded) resistor would be within in one ohm of actually being 100.
Most cheap bulk parts are what we call 20% ‘ers… They usually get pretty close, and in many things they can be off a lot because their function is not to connect to something that if it doesn’t have exactly what it wants in its input it fails or burns up.

When a 3rd party video card outfit licenses the design and card name they get the circuit design.
The design specs are based on the all the components specs, with the tolerance of each component to the whole circuit for a max reliable output speed.

If a 3rd party video card maker looks over the design and says
“if we replace all these 10% resistors with 5%’ers we can assure a stable 1MHz overclock”
that would be good.

The bottom line however is that overclocking is not about the big parts you see, it’s all those little tiny parts you see everywhere else on the board.
For the most part, the “big stuff” that burns up in overclocking is caused by one failure cascading to more of those little baby rice cornel things you see soldered all over because they didn’t meet the spec in their range overclocked.

In short it’s a crap shoot.
If they improved the component specs and manufacture them that way great.
If not, it’s the same as overclocking your own spec card.

Maybe you get one with all the circuitry within 5% tolerance of spec and it will handle more.
Then again, you may get one with a couple of crucial parts way out of needed spec for the circuit.

At $500 a throw, that’s a pretty big bet on hundreds of tiny little components.

KC's Kruisers - It's all how you look at things ©¿©¬
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Stalkerrob
Senior Member
MY PC

Canada
555 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2008 :  1:15:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
ya i wont be overclocking this beast i believe that's why my 2nd 3870 wont stay on for longer then 2 mins at all so i wont be overclocking vid cards ever again probably


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WhyNot
Advanced Member
MY PC

Canada
913 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2008 :  7:05:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
ya im not shure rob. do like i do when i cant decide. eeeene meene miny moe

after all why_not :P
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Stalkerrob
Senior Member
MY PC

Canada
555 Posts

Posted - 09/03/2008 :  8:02:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
lol i think i'm gonna go with the ASUS one i like asus to begin with.


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KC
Head Honcho
MY PC

USA
3052 Posts

Posted - 09/04/2008 :  09:05:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
ASUS is a good quality outfit, at least with motherboards, I haven't tried their Vid cards.

I hope you found my basic electronics lesson on the "samll parts" when it comes to overclocking helpfull.

Component level electronic design has fasinated me since I was a kid and why I went to AZ Tech to get a Certified Electronics Tech degree years ago.
The school crammed a 1000 hours into one year for the degree. I loved it, and graduated with highest honors ;-}

I highly recommend any of you young guys still in school that want to "play" with electronic stuff take at least a semester of basic electronics and IC logic.

Knowing the fundimental properites and purpose of basic compontents is a very powerful tool to learn. You will use it your whole life, and least I have.




KC's Kruisers - It's all how you look at things ©¿©¬
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